Description


A diary of my mothing activity covering highlights and photos from my moth trapping activities. Mainly Norfolk (UK), occasionally beyond. I may mention other wildlife sightings here, especially insects, but for birds see my birding diary.

Friday, 18 January 2019

2 new moths, a very decent Lacewing and more

The night of 2nd August was brilliant.  89 species of moth wasn't a legendary total but there were some great quality moths and other insects among them.  Pick of the moths was a rare, nationally scarce A moth that I had never seen before.

Cocksfoot Moth Glyphipterix simpliciella is an exceedingly common species which can quite easily be found in their hundreds feeding in Ox-eye Daisies and other wildflowers during the day-time.  I see them around North Elmham in abundance, but in four years of nightly light-trapping I have never caught a single individual in my garden.  So when I found what looked very much like one in my moth trap, two thoughts went through my mind.  First, this is a new moth for the garden, and second, given that simpliciella doesn't normally come to my trap, might this be one of the rarer congeners that I've never seen before, anywhere?

At first I thought it was perhaps a little larger than simpliciella that I'm used to seeing, which put me in mind of haworthana - but in fact it wasn't nearly big enough for that (I measured it just to be sure).  Easily observable external features ruled out all but two species - the very common simpliciella and the much rarer schoenicolella.  The literature cites three differences in the external appearance of these two species - the colour of the cilia (hairs) on the edge of the hindwing, which are very hard to see on an insect that tends to keep its hindwings covered up, the relative spacing of the bars along the costa (the leading edge of the wings) and the eveness in colour of the forewing and extent of copper near the apex.  Having looked at scores of pictures of both species on the internet I am not convinced of the reliability of any of these features except the colour of the cilia.  The few glimpses I got of its hindwings looked encouraging - very encouraging in fact.  I was pretty sure I could see brilliant white cilia there, near the base of the wings, but I couldn't get a clear enough view to be sure while the insect was still alive.  When I could eventually examine it without it moving I was delighted to see glistening white cilia at the proximal end of the dorsal edge of both hindwings, strongly contrasting with the greyer cilia in the outer half or two-thirds.  It had to be Bog-rush Fanner Glyphipterix schoenicolella.  That's an unexpected find here as it feeds on Black Bog-rush, a species that does not appear round according to the maps in A Flora of Norfolk.  It's not all that far away though, and with a widespread scattering of records across the county (including Dereham and Reepham areas) I imagine it is possible that it grows closer to here than the maps show.


Bog-rush Fanner Glyphipterix schoenicolella, North Elmham, 2nd August


I checked the genitalia too, just to make doubly sure, although looking at the images of female genitalia of both species online it wasn't very clear what the differences are.  One website suggests a possible difference but I couldn't really see this on the images, and indeed the relavant bit of the genitalia seems to be hard to keep intact when preparing specimens as it is completely missing from most photos (although I did see it on mine during prepraration I had lost it by the time I finished).  However, I think I can see two or three other differences between the two species:
  1. On both species the papillae anales, the very tip of the abdomen, have a tiny discrete projection at their very tip.  On simpiciella this seems to be bigger, starting as a continuation of the more proximal section and narrowing gradually to form a point, whereas on schoenicolella this seems to start narrower than the adjacent more proximal section, so stepped at least on the outer side and is therefore tinier and sharper.
  2. Between the two papillae anales just below their broadest sections the membrane is covered in longitudinally wrinkled light sclerotisation.  This seems to be thicker and more sclerotised on schoenicolella, though I'm not sure how much this could depend on how the genitalia are prepared.
  3. On both species the sclerotisation on the 8th segment is extended centrally into a triangular pointed projection pointing distally.  On schoenicolella this projection seems to be shorter, just a little longer than an equilateral triangle and with straight sides coming to a point, whereas on simpiciella it is more horn-shaped, a longer clearly isosceles triangle with convex sides and a rounded or at least blunt tip.  
These suggested differences are based on just a very small number of images so I cannot say that any of them are diagnostic, or with any great confidence that they should even be remotely useful.  However if they do prove to be valid differences then my moth clearly meets all three criteria for schoenicolella.



female genitalia of Bog-rush Fanner Glyphipterix schoenicolella, North Elmham, 2nd August


The second new moth for me was a slightly commoner species, Elm Midget Phyllonorycter tristrigella.  There are a number of similar species but on this one the third dorsal fascia is distinctively angled back in a sort of chevron shape.  I was therefore fairly confident about this ID before chopping it, but as its genitalia are also quite distinctive I checked it under the microscope too.


Elm Midget Phyllonorycter tristrigella (male, gen det), North Elmham, 2nd August


There were a number of other new moths for the year too: Oak Bent-wing Bucculatrix ulmella, Brown Rowan Argent Argyresthia semifusca, 2 Heather Tortrixes Argyrotaenia ljungiana, Orange Swift, Sallow Kitten and Six-striped Rustic.

Oak Bent-wing Bucculatrix ulmella, North Elmham, 2nd August


Brown Rowan Argent Argyresthia semifusca, North Elmham, 2nd August


Heather Tortrix Argyrotaenia ljungiana, North Elmham, 2nd August


Orange Swift, North Elmham, 2nd August


Sallow Kitten, North Elmham, 2nd August


Six-striped Rustic, North Elmham, 2nd August


A few other species were noteworthy too:  White-speckled Clothes Moth Nemapogon koenigi, Pointed Slender Parornix finitimella, Ruddy Flat-body Agonopterix subpropinquella, Mouse-ear Groundling Caryocolum fraternella, Dark Umber and Twin-spotted Wainscot.

White-speckled Clothes Moth Nemapogon koenigi, North Elmham, 2nd August


Ruddy Flat-body Agonopterix subpropinquella, North Elmham, 2nd August


Mouse-ear Groundling Caryocolum fraternella (male, gen det), North Elmham, 2nd August


The other moths were Bordered Carl Coptotriche marginea, 3 Bird’s-nest Moths Tinea trinotella, Blackthorn Slender Parornix torquillella, Horse-Chestnut Leaf-miner Cameraria ohridella, Bird-cherry Ermine Yponomeuta evonymella, 4 Diamond-backs Plutella xylostella, Clover Case-bearer Coleophora alcyonipennella, Woundwort Case-bearer Coleophora lineolea, 2 Golden-brown Tubics Crassa unitella, Long-horned Flat-body Carcina quercana, Brindled Flat-body Agonopterix arenella, Dark Neb Bryotropha affinis, 2 Cinerous Nebs Bryotropha terrella, 2 House Nebs Bryotropha domestica, an Oegoconia sp. that escaped, 4 Dingy Dowds Blastobasis adustella, 2 Light Brown Apple-moths Epiphyas postvittana, Maple Button Acleris forsskaleana, 2 Garden Rose Tortrixes Acleris variegana, Barred Marble Celypha striana, 3 Rush Marbles Bactra lancealana, Holly Tortrix Rhopobota naevana, Bright Bell Eucosma hohenwartiana, Hoary Bell Eucosma cana, 3 Marbled Piercers Cydia splendana, Codling Moth Cydia pomonella, Pale-streak Grass-veneer Agriphila selasella, 38 Straw Grass-veneers Agriphila straminella, 24 Common Grass-veneers Agriphila tristella, Chequered Grass-veneer Catoptria falsella, 15 Water Veneers Acentria ephemerella, Ringed China-mark Parapoynx stratiotata, 4 Garden Pebbles Evergestis forficalis, Pale Straw Pearl Udea lutealis, 18 Mother of Pearls Pleuroptya ruralis, 4 Grey Knot-horns Acrobasis advenella, Dotted Oak Knot-horn Phycita roborella, 2 Common Plumes Emmelina monodactyla, Maiden's Blush, Blood-vein, Small Fan-footed Wave, 4 Single-dotted Waves, 2 Riband Waves, 7 Red Twin-spot Carpets, 2 Dark-barred Twin-spot Carpets, 6 Common Carpets, Small Rivulet, 2 Maple Pugs, 2 Lime-speck Pugs, 2 Wormwood Pugs, Grey Pug, Magpie Moth, 2 Bordered Beauties, 2 Early Thorns, Iron Prominent, Yellow-tail, 6 Dingy Footmen, Common Footman, Buff Ermine, Ruby Tiger, 3 Turnip Moths, 2 Shuttle-shaped Darts, 8 Flame Shoulders, Lesser Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing, 13 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, Square-spotted Clay, 2 Common Wainscots, Copper Underwing, 2 Straw Underwings, Angle Shades, 2 Dun-bars, Dark Arches, Common Rustic, Small Rufous and 9 Straw Dots.

Although the new moths were very exciting, neither of them were fully identified on the morning that I found them.  Well neither was this lacewing, but I was pretty sure it would prove to be something I had never seen before.  And so it turned out - it was Hemerobius nitidulus, a pine-feeding species that had been recorded in Norfolk 5 times up to 1988 and not since, at least until the last summary publication of records that was published in 2016. 


Hemerobius nitidulus, North Elmham, 2nd August


Other brown lacewings were Hemerobius lutescens and 4 Micromus variegatus. Green lacewings consisted of Chrysopa commata (new for the year) and Dichochrysa flavifrons. The only mayflies were 5 Green Drakes Ephemera danica, and once again all five were dead in the bottom of the trap.   Caddisflies were Hydropsyche pellucidula and 2 Hydropsyche siltalai.

Chrysopa commata, North Elmham, 2nd August


No new bugs for a change (lots recently) but a variety of species: Birch Shieldbug, Blepharidopterus angulatus, Lygus pratensis, Psallus haematodes and the leafhopper Empoasca vitis.

There was one more lifer waiting for me: a Lesser Mealworm Beetle Alphitobius diaperinus.  Also among the beetles the water-beetle Rhantus suturalis was new for the year and there were 5 Bradycellus verbasci along with single Hydrobius fuscipes and Aphodius rufipes.

Lesser Mealworm Beetle Alphitobius diaperinus, North Elmham, 2nd August


Rhatnus suturalis, North Elmham, 2nd August


The following evening I had a wander round the Cathedral Meadows with a torch and found a selection of moths: Hawthorn Slender Parornix anglicella, Common Mompha Mompha epilobiella, Common Marble Celypha lacunana, Rush Marble Bactra lancealana, 2 Common Grass-veneers Agriphila tristella, Pale Straw Pearl Udea lutealis, 14 Mother of Pearls Pleuroptya ruralis, Orange Swift, Blood-vein, Single-dotted Wave, Dark-barred Twin-spot Carpet, Yellow Shell, Coxcomb Prominent, Flame Shoulder, Square-spotted Clay, 4 Silver Ys and Straw Dot.  There were also 3 Common Earwigs, the green lacewing Dichochrysa flavifrons and 2 Common Toads.

Orange Swift, North Elmham Cathedral Meadows, 3rd August

Wednesday, 16 January 2019

Clouded and unclouded Magpies

The macro moths were the highlights on 31st July with my third ever (but second this year) Dark Spinach and a Clouded Magpie which was only my third here in 4 years.  Dusky Thorn was also new for the year.

Dark Spinach, North Elmham, 31st July


Clouded Magpie, North Elmham, 31st July


Other macros were Least Carpet, 4 Single-dotted Waves, 2 Riband Waves, 2 Red Twin-spot Carpets, 2 Dark-barred Twin-spot Carpets, Common Carpet, Small Phoenix, Currant Pug, Magpie Moth, Scorched Carpet, Brimstone Moth, Early Thorn, Scalloped Oak, 2 Willow Beauties, Coxcomb Prominent, Black Arches, 10 Dingy Footmen, Scarce Footman, Common Footman, 3 Buff Ermines, 4 Ruby Tigers, 2 Turnip Moths, Heart and Club, 3 Shuttle-shaped Darts, 4 Flame Shoulders, Lesser Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing, 6 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, Smoky Wainscot, 2 Common Wainscots, Straw Underwing, Dun-bar, 2 Dark Arches, Cloaked Minor, 2 Common Rustics, Uncertain, Rustic and 8 Straw Dots.

Magpie Moth, North Elmham, 31st July


The micros were Carrion Moth Monopis weaverella, Bird-cherry Ermine Yponomeuta evonymella, Little Ermine Swammerdamia pyrella, Wainscot Smudge Ypsolopha scabrella, 2 Long-horned Flat-bodies Carcina quercana, 2 House Nebs Bryotropha domestica, Pointed Groundling Scrobipalpa acuminatella, 5 Dingy Dowds Blastobasis adustella, London Dowd Blastobasis lacticolella, Straw Conch Cochylimorpha straminea, 2 Common Yellow Conches Agapeta hamana, Dark Fruit-tree Tortrix Pandemis heparana, Privet Tortrix Clepsis consimilana, Garden Rose Tortrix Acleris variegana, Bright Bell Eucosma hohenwartiana, Bud Moth Spilonota ocellana, Marbled Piercer Cydia splendana, 37 Straw Grass-veneers Agriphila straminella, 15 Common Grass-veneers Agriphila tristella, 2 Water Veneers Acentria ephemerella, Small Grey Eudonia mercurella, Brown China-mark Elophila nymphaeata, Ringed China-mark Parapoynx stratiotata, Garden Pebble Evergestis forficalis, 3 Pale Straw Pearls Udea lutealis, 15 Mother of Pearls Pleuroptya ruralis, Thicket Knot-horn Acrobasis suavella and 4 Common Plumes Emmelina monodactyla.

House Neb Bryotropha domestica, North Elmham, 31st July


Straw Conch Cochylimorpha straminea, North Elmham, 31st July


Other things included the mayfly Blue-winged Olive Serratella ignita, a Common Earwig, the brown lacewings Hemerobius lutescens and 2 Micromus variegatus, the caddisflies 2 Hydropsyche siltalai and Molanna angustata, the mirid bug Psallus varians, the leafhopper Balclutha punctata and a Hornet.

While setting a bat detector at the Cathedral Meadows at dusk on 1st August I found a Straw Grass-veneer Agriphila straminella and a leafhopper that I didn't immediately recognise. It turned out to be a new species for me, Macropsis scotti.

Macropsis scotti, North Elmham Cathedral Meadows, 1st August


That night there were 5 new moths for the year: Winter Groundling Scrobipalpa costella (only my second here), Marbled Mompha Mompha propinquella, Rhomboid Tortrix Acleris rhombana, Cabbage Moth and Angle Shades. The rhombana was my earliest ever by 12 days.

Winter Groundling Scrobipalpa costella, North Elmham, 1st August


Marbled Mompha Mompha propinquella (male, gen det), North Elmham, 1st August


Rhomboid Tortrix Acleris rhombana, North Elmham, 1st August


Cabbage Moth, North Elmham, 1st August


Angle Shades, North Elmham, 1st August


A record count of  5 Small Purple & Golds Pyrausta aurata was remarkable for here.  I only caught 5 singles across the whole of the previous 3 summers but either it is a good year for them or else they have taken a liking to the mint we planted in the garden a couple of years ago.  Although I eventually recorded 11 in the garden this summer they were only recorded on 5 nights spread over a period of just over a month.

5 Turnip Moths was also a record count, but in this case it was definitely a case of it being a good year for them as I know a lot of other moth-ers recorded exceptional numbers this year (much higher numbers than me in many cases).  I don't usually get many (only two last year and three the year before) but this year I'm looking like I will end up with a total of around 50 (I'm not sure the exact number yet as I have 2-3 slightly equivocal ones in pots waiting to be confirmed).  I know many people get more than that in a normal year and were getting 3-figure counts in a single night this year.

Other moths were Hawthorn Slender Parornix anglicella, Horse-Chestnut Leaf-miner Cameraria ohridella, Woundwort Case-bearer Coleophora lineolea, 2 Long-horned Flat-bodies Carcina quercana, Orange Crest Helcystogramma rufescens, 3 Dingy Dowds Blastobasis adustella, Little Mompha Mompha raschkiella, 4 Dark Fruit-tree Tortrixes Pandemis heparana, Light Brown Apple-moth Epiphyas postvittana, Garden Rose Tortrix Acleris variegana, Barred Marble Celypha striana, Common Marble Celypha lacunana, Pine Marble Piniphila bifasciana, Holly Tortrix Rhopobota naevana, Hoary Bell Eucosma cana, 2 Marbled Piercers Cydia splendana, Garden Grass-veneer Chrysoteuchia culmella, 41 Straw Grass-veneers Agriphila straminella, 10 Common Grass-veneers Agriphila tristella, 2 Garden Pebbles Evergestis forficalis, 2 Pale Straw Pearls Udea lutealis, 9 Mother of Pearls Pleuroptya ruralis, 2 Grey Knot-horns Acrobasis advenella, Beautiful Plume Amblyptilia acanthadactyla, 2 Common Plumes Emmelina monodactyla, Pebble Hook-tip, Maiden's Blush, Blood-vein, Small Dusty Wave, 5 Single-dotted Waves, Riband Wave, 7 Red Twin-spot Carpets, Dark-barred Twin-spot Carpet, Garden Carpet, Purple Bar, Small Rivulet, Currant Pug, Magpie Moth, Scorched Carpet, Bordered Beauty, Scalloped Oak, 3 Willow Beauties, 4 Dingy Footmen, 2 Common Footmen, Shuttle-shaped Dart, 3 Flames, 7 Flame Shoulders, Lesser Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing, 3 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, 2 Common Wainscots, Copper Underwing, 2 Dun-bars, Cloaked Minor, Common Rustic, Small Rufous, Vine's Rustic, 3 Silver Ys and 5 Straw Dots.

Purple Bar, North Elmham, 1st August


Other things included the mayflies Green Drake Ephemera danica and 6 Blue-winged Olives Serratella ignita, the green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea agg., 2 brown lacewings Micromus variegatus, the caddisflies 2 Hydropsyche siltalai, Crunoecia irrorata and Athripsodes aterrimus, Birch Shieldbug, the leafhopper Balclutha punctata again, the beetles Amara apricaria and Aphodius rufipes, Hornet and Common Wasp.

Sunday, 13 January 2019

My second Sisyra and another basaltinella

Six species of lacewing on 29th July was a good haul and two of them were new for the year: my second ever Sisyra fuscata and a Nineta vittata.  Other lacewings 2 Chrysoperla carnea, 2 Cunctochrysa albolineata and Dichochrysa ventralis, and 4 of the brown lacewing Micromus variegatus.

Sisyra fuscata, North Elmham, 29th July


Nineta vittata, North Elmham, 29th July


Only one moth was new for the year: Bulrush Cosmet Limnaecia phragmitella. The other micros were 2 Chestnut Pigmies Stigmella samiatella, Bordered Carl Coptotriche marginea, Apple Leaf-miner Lyonetia clerkella, Brown Birch Slender Parornix betulae, 2 Horse-Chestnut Leaf-miners Cameraria ohridella, presumed Willow Bent-wing Phyllocnistis saligna, Gold-ribbon Argent Argyresthia brockeella, 4 Golden Argents Argyresthia goedartella, Cherry-fruit Moth Argyresthia pruniella, Honeysuckle Moth Ypsolopha dentella, 2 Diamond-backs Plutella xylostella, Woundwort Case-bearer Coleophora lineolea, 3 Small Dingy Tubics Borkhausenia fuscescens, 2 Long-horned Flat-bodies Carcina quercana, Common Flat-body Agonopterix heracliana, 2 Common Groundlings Teleiodes vulgella, Dark Neb Bryotropha affinis, 11 Cinerous Nebs Bryotropha terrella, 31 Dingy Dowds Blastobasis adustella, Straw Conch Cochylimorpha straminea, Knapweed Conch Agapeta zoegana, Dover Shade Cnephasia genitalana, 4 Holly Tortrixes Rhopobota naevana, 2 Bright Bells Eucosma hohenwartiana, 2 Hoary Bells Eucosma cana, 3 Marbled Piercers Cydia splendana, Pale-streak Grass-veneer Agriphila selasella, 63 Straw Grass-veneers Agriphila straminella, 15 Common Grass-veneers Agriphila tristella, Chequered Grass-veneer Catoptria falsella, Small Grey Eudonia mercurella, Ringed China-mark Parapoynx stratiotata, 7 Mother of Pearls Pleuroptya ruralis and Common Plume Emmelina monodactyla.

Gold-ribbon Argent Argyresthia brockeella, North Elmham, 29th July


Honeysuckle Moth Ypsolopha dentella, North Elmham, 29th July


Macros consisted of 3 Small Fan-footed Waves, 4 Single-dotted Waves, Small Scallop, 3 Riband Waves, 6 Red Twin-spot Carpets, Shaded Broad-bar, Common Carpet, 2 Lime-speck Pugs, Bordered Pug, 2 Magpie Moths, Early Thorn, Willow Beauty, Yellow-tail, 10 Dingy Footmen, Common Footman, 4 Ruby Tigers, 3 Turnip Moths, 3 Shuttle-shaped Darts, 6 Flame Shoulders, 2 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, 2 Clays, Copper Underwing, Straw Underwing, 2 Dun-bars, Double Lobed, 3 Common Rustics, Fen Wainscot, 3 Uncertains, 3 Rustics, 9 Straw Dots and Snout.

Two bugs were new for the year: the mirid bug Blepharidopterus angulatus and the leafhopper Alebra albostriella.  Others were 2 Birch Shieldbugs, Macrotylus horvathi, Phytocoris longipennis, Phytocoris varipes, Psallus varians, 3 Trigonotylus caelestialium and another Kybos strigilifer.

Blepharideopterus angulatus, North Elmham, 29th July


Alebra albostriella, North Elmham, 29th July


Other insects included 2 Pond Olives Cloeon dipterum (mayflies), the caddisflies Polycentropus flavomaculatus, Limnephilus auricula and 2 Limnephilus rhombicus, 2 Harlequin Ladybirds and 4 Hornets.

Next day at the Cathedral Meacdows moths included 6 Straw Grass-veneers Agriphila straminella, Common Grass-veneer Agriphila tristella and Silver Y. There was also a leafmine of Firethorn Leaf-miner Phyllonorycter leucographella in Apple and there were 6 7-spot Ladybirds.

Back at home a moth inside proved to be my seventh - and Norfolk's seventh - Thatch Neb Bryotropha basaltinella.

Thatch Neb Bryotropha basaltinella (male, gen det), North Elmham, 30th July


New moths for the year that night were 2 Dark-triangle Buttons Acleris laterana, Orange-spotted Shoot Rhyacionia pinicolana and Square-spotted Clay.


Dark-triangle Buttons Acleris laterana (males, gen det), North Elmham, 30th July


Orange-spotted Shoot Rhyacionia pinicolana, North Elmham, 30th July


Other micros were 2 Bird’s-nest Moths Tinea trinotella, Maple Slender Caloptilia semifascia, Brown Birch Slender Parornix betulae, Hawthorn Slender Parornix anglicella, Golden Argent Argyresthia goedartella, 2 Bird-cherry Ermines Yponomeuta evonymella, 2 Little Ermines Swammerdamia pyrella, 4 Diamond-backs Plutella xylostella, Grey-streaked Diamond-back Plutella porrectella, Clover Case-bearer Coleophora alcyonipennella, 2 Little Dwarfs Elachista canapennella, Brown House Moth Hofmannophila pseudospretella, 2 Long-horned Flat-bodies Carcina quercana, 2 Brindled Flat-bodies Agonopterix arenella, 4 Cinerous Nebs Bryotropha terrella, Pointed Groundling Scrobipalpa acuminatella, 3 Dingy Dowds Blastobasis adustella, Common Yellow Conch Agapeta hamana, Dark Fruit-tree Tortrix Pandemis heparana, Light Brown Apple-moth Epiphyas postvittana, Hoary Bell Eucosma cana, Marbled Piercer Cydia splendana, 63 Straw Grass-veneers Agriphila straminella, 21 Common Grass-veneers Agriphila tristella, Chequered Grass-veneer Catoptria falsella, 2 Water Veneers Acentria ephemerella, Little Grey Eudonia lacustrata, 2 Small Greys Eudonia mercurella, 2 Ringed China-marks Parapoynx stratiotata, 2 Garden Pebbles Evergestis forficalis, 3 Pale Straw Pearls Udea lutealis, 2 Dusky Pearls Udea prunalis, 27 Mother of Pearls Pleuroptya ruralis, Rosy Tabby Endotricha flammealis, 3 Grey Knot-horns Acrobasis advenella and Ash-bark Knot-horn Euzophera pinguis.

The other macros were Chinese Character, Blood-vein, 3 Single-dotted Waves, 5 Riband Waves, 5 Red Twin-spot Carpets, 3 Dark-barred Twin-spot Carpets, Shaded Broad-bar, 3 Common Carpets, 2 Yellow Shells, Double-striped Pug, Brimstone Moth, 3 Scalloped Oaks, 4 Willow Beauties, 2 Coxcomb Prominents, Yellow-tail, 10 Dingy Footmen, 3 Common Footmen, Buff Ermine, 3 Ruby Tigers, 2 Turnip Moths, Shuttle-shaped Dart, 7 Flame Shoulders, Lesser Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing, 2 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, Brown-line Bright Eye, 3 Smoky Wainscots, 2 Common Wainscots, Marbled Beauty, 4 Common Rustics, 2 Lesser Common Rustics, (one unchecked Common Rustic agg.), Fen Wainscot, 3 Uncertains, 2 Rustics, 2 Silver Ys and 8 Straw Dots.

Marbled Beauty, North Elmham, 30th July


Other bits and pieces included the mayflies Green Drake Ephemera danica and 7 Blue-winged Olives Serratella ignita, the brown lacewing Micromus variegatus (2), the caddisflies Hydropsyche siltalai and Grouse Wing Mystacides longicornis, the beetles Aphodius rufipes and 4 Bradycellus verbascis, 2 Hornets and Common Wasp.

Friday, 11 January 2019

New bugs keep on coming, and a new moth for the garden

After 4 new bugs the previous day it was pretty impressive that I recorded another 5 new bugs in the moth trap on 27th July.  There were fewer moths (just 282 of 68 species and none new for the year) but the bugs made it a worthwhile catch.

The new bugs included Compsidolon salicellum and Psallus falleni. The other heteroptera were Birch Shieldbug and Megalocoleus molliculus, the latter my third this year of a species I recorded for the first time this year.

Compsidolon salicellum, North Elmham, 27th July


Psallus falleni, North Elmham, 27th July


Megalocoleus molliculus, North Elmham, 27th July


There were 3 leafhoppers, all Kybos spp.  Two were females and thus unidentifiable but the male eventually turned out to be Kybos strigilifer, my first ever confirmed example.

Kybos strigilifer (male), North Elmham, 27th July


There were also 2 psyllids, and both were new species for me.  One relatively big and obvious one was Psallus alni and the other was far trickier to identify but after much gazing down the microscope and at the keys I eventually concluded was Cacopsylla pulchra.

Psallus alni, North Elmham, 27th July


Cacopsylla pulchra, North Elmham, 27th July


There was also an unprecedented influx of what I call greenfly.  I had assumed that there were a number of different species (and that I had no means of identifying them) but one source I've since found implies that they are all Rose Aphids.  As I didn't retain any I can't check that, but whatever there were there were literally hundreds of them in the trap.  I've never had anything like that before.

The micro moths were Hazel Slender Parornix devoniella, 2 Golden Argents Argyresthia goedartella, Grey Ermine Yponomeuta sedella, Little Ermine Swammerdamia pyrella, 3 Diamond-backs Plutella xylostella, Common Case-bearer Coleophora serratella, 4 Clover Case-bearers Coleophora alcyonipennella, Little Dwarf Elachista canapennella, 2 Small Dingy Tubics Borkhausenia fuscescens, Common Flat-body Agonopterix heracliana, 2 Brindled Flat-bodies Agonopterix arenella, Dark Neb Bryotropha affinis, Dull Red Neb Bryotropha senectella, 6 Dingy Dowds Blastobasis adustella, Common Yellow Conch Agapeta hamana, Knapweed Conch Agapeta zoegana, 2 Dark Fruit-tree Tortrixes Pandemis heparana, Privet Tortrix Clepsis consimilana, Light Brown Apple-moth Epiphyas postvittana, Red-barred Tortrix Ditula angustiorana, Maple Button Acleris forsskaleana, 2 Garden Rose Tortrixes Acleris variegana, 2 Barred Marbles Celypha striana, 3 Hoary Bells Eucosma cana, Red Piercer Lathronympha strigana, 2 Marbled Piercers Cydia splendana, 115 Straw Grass-veneers Agriphila straminella, 28 Common Grass-veneers Agriphila tristella, Pearl Grass-veneer Catoptria pinella, Chequered Grass-veneer Catoptria falsella, Small Grey Eudonia mercurella, Ringed China-mark Parapoynx stratiotata, 2 Garden Pebbles Evergestis forficalis, 2 Small Purple & Golds Pyrausta aurata, 10 Mother of Pearls Pleuroptya ruralis and 2 Rosy Tabbies Endotricha flammealis.

Common Case-bearer Coleophora serratella (female, gen det), North Elmham, 27th July


Macros consisted of 2 Small Fan-footed Waves, 3 Single-dotted Waves, Riband Wave, Red Twin-spot Carpet, Dark-barred Twin-spot Carpet, 3 Shaded Broad-bars, Common Carpet, Small Phoenix, Lime-speck Pug, Double-striped Pug, Canary-shouldered Thorn, Early Thorn, 8 Dingy Footmen, 5 Common Footmen, 2 Ruby Tigers, 2 Shuttle-shaped Darts, 11 Flame Shoulders, Least Yellow Underwing, Setaceous Hebrew Character, Clay, Smoky Wainscot, Copper Underwing, Straw Underwing, 3 Dun-bars, 2 Cloaked Minors, Lesser Common Rustic, 3 Uncertains, 2 Rustics, Nut-tree Tussock, Silver Y, Spectacle and 9 Straw Dots.

Other insects included the mayflies 2 Pond Olives Cloeon dipterum and 4 Pale Evening Duns Procloeon bifidum, the green lacewings Chrysoperla carnea (a confirmed male and 2 presumed females) and Dichochrysa flavifrons, the brown lacewings Hemerobius lutescens (new for the year) and 4 Micromus variegatus, the caddisflies 2 Hydropsyche siltalai, Mottled Sedge Glyphotaelius pellucidus and 7 Limnephilus auricula, 2 Bradycellus verbasci (beetles), 2 Harlequin Ladybirds, a Marmalade Fly Episyrphus balteatus and 2 Hornets.

Next day at the Cathedral Meadows Essex Skipper was the best of the butterflies.

Essex Skipper, North Elmham Cathedral Meadows, 28th July


Dragonflies included Banded Demoiselle and Common Darter.

Bamded Demoiselle, North Elmham Cathedral Meadows, 28th July


Common Darter, North Elmham Cathedral Meadows, 28th July


Moths were Maple Button Acleris forsskaleana, 3 Straw Grass-veneers Agriphila straminella, 2 Common Grass-veneers Agriphila tristella, 2 Pale Straw Pearls Udea lutealis and Yellow Shell.

There was a Blue-winged Olive Serratella ignita (a mayfly) and both Field and Meadow Grasshoppers.  There were 20 7-spot Ladybirds, 2 Marmalade Flies Episyrphus balteatus, a Common Wasp and a Garden Bumblebee.

Common Wasp, North Elmham Cathedral Meadows, 28th July


Garden Bumblebee, North Elmham Cathedral Meadows, 28th July


That night there were only 49 species of moth in the garden, but one of them was new for the garden, Waste Grass-veneer Pediasia contaminella, and another new for the year, Small Birch Bell Epinotia ramella.


Waste Grass-veneer Pediasia contaminella, North Elmham, 28th July


Small Birch Bell Epinotia ramella, North Elmham, 28th July


The other 47 were Bird’s-nest Moth Tinea trinotella, Clover Case-bearer Coleophora alcyonipennella, Little Dwarf Elachista canapennella, Common Flat-body Agonopterix heracliana, 2 Brindled Flat-bodies Agonopterix arenella, Cinerous Neb Bryotropha terrella, Orange Crest Helcystogramma rufescens, 5 Dingy Dowds Blastobasis adustella, Rush Marble Bactra lancealana, 2 Marbled Piercers Cydia splendana, Garden Grass-veneer Chrysoteuchia culmella, 55 Straw Grass-veneers Agriphila straminella, 19 Common Grass-veneers Agriphila tristella, Chequered Grass-veneer Catoptria falsella, Small Grey Eudonia mercurella, Ringed China-mark Parapoynx stratiotata, Pale Straw Pearl Udea lutealis, 2 Mother of Pearls Pleuroptya ruralis, Rosy Tabby Endotricha flammealis, Beautiful Plume Amblyptilia acanthadactyla, 2 Common Plumes Emmelina monodactyla, 2 Single-dotted Waves, Small Scallop, 3 Riband Waves, 2 Red Twin-spot Carpets, 3 Dark-barred Twin-spot Carpets, 2 Shaded Broad-bars, 2 Magpie Moths, Scorched Carpet, Coxcomb Prominent, Yellow-tail, Common Footman, Buff Ermine, 2 Ruby Tigers, Turnip Moth, 2 Shuttle-shaped Darts, 2 Flame Shoulders, 3 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, Copper Underwing, Straw Underwing, Common Rustic, Lesser Common Rustic, Uncertain, 2 Rustics, Silver Y, 4 Straw Dots and Snout.

There wasn't much else apart from moths either: the mayfly Pond Olive Cloeon dipterum, the brown lacewing Micromus variegatus, the caddisflies 3 Limnephilus rhombicus, the mirid bug Lygus rugulipennis and a Hornet.